Posts Tagged With: charismatics

Eusebius on Christ’s fulfillment and cessation of prophecy/priesthood/kingship 

eusebius_of_caesareaNow there were among the Hebrews three outstanding offices of dignity, which made the nation famous, firstly the kingship, secondly that of prophet, and lastly the high priesthood. The prophecies said that the abolition and complete destruction of all these three together would be the sign of the presence of the Christ. And that the proofs that the times had come, would lie in the ceasing of the Mosaic worship, the desolation of Jerusalem and its Temple, and the subjection of the whole Jewish race to its enemies…The holy oracles foretold that all these changes, which had not been made in the days of the prophets of old, would take place at the coming of the Christ, which I will presently shew to have been fulfilled as never before in accordance with the predictions.” (Eusebius, Demonstratio Evangelica VIII)

Categories: Bible, Doctrine, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Pastor Mark, Do Reformed Churches Really Neglect the Holy Spirit?

Mark_DriscollIn a recent post entitled, Is the Trinity Father, Son, and Holy Bible?, Seattle Pastor Mark Driscoll writes, “In Reformed churches, you won’t hear a lot about the Spirit, as they tend to attribute much of his work to the gospel and the sovereignty of God.  So when lives are changed, the explanation is that what happened was because of the gospel without much reference to the Spirit’s application of it.”

Now I don’t know what experience Pastor Mark has in Reformed churches, but I would like to point out a couple things.

1. According to Reformed theology, as preached in Reformed churches, the primary means of sanctification is the illuminating work of the Holy Spirit, secretly communicating, persuading, and applying the word to believers.  At our congregation, I pray every Sunday in a specific purposeful prayer before the sermon that the Holy Spirit would work in us to make us more holy through the word.  This is known as the prayer of illumination, and has been a staple of Reformed worship ever since Calvin published La Forme de Prières et Chants Ecclélsiastiques, (1542) aka. the Genevan Liturgy.  And when we pray for the Spirit to illuminate us, we mean it, and we expect it, as I’m sure most Reformed churches do.  I usually preface it with a pithy exhortation reminding us how absolutely necessary the Spirit’s work is for us to benefit from His word.  So much for not talking much about the Spirit!

2.  According to Reformed believers, the Spirit’s greatest miracle is in the regeneration or New Birth of a sinner.  It is His own sovereign, particular, and peculiar work from start to finish.  Reformed preachers, myself included, tend to make the Spirit’s work in regeneration a specific point of emphasis.  As it should be.

There, now I feel much better.  Now, do you think that the Reformed tend not to emphasize the Holy Spirit?

Categories: Doctrine | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Blog at WordPress.com.